Taking the Pulse of a Sandstone Tower in Utah ~ The New York Times

Castleton Tower, near Moab, pulsates at about the rate of a human heartbeat as it taps into the earth’s natural vibrations.

CreditCreditKat Vollinger

In 2013, a mutual friend brought Kat Vollinger and Nathan Richman together as rock climbing partners. Within a few years, they were married, and their shared love of climbing led them on adventures around the world. That’s how, in March 2018, they found themselves scaling Castleton Tower, a nearly 400-foot sandstone spire near Moab, Utah, with a seismometer in tow.

They helped scientists measure, for the first time, how Castleton Tower taps into the earth’s natural vibrations, finding that it pulsates at about the rate of a human heartbeat.

Castleton Tower is one of many culturally significant desert rock formations that Jeff Moore, a geologist, and his team at the Geohazards research group at the University of Utah have been monitoring with audio recordings. Like a doctor listening to the beating of a human heart, they hope to learn about the structural health of these arches, bridges and towers and how their environments affect them.

One thought on “Taking the Pulse of a Sandstone Tower in Utah ~ The New York Times

  1. Emery, this is so magnificent I can’t stop smiling….life is everywhere if we can just be open enough to access it. Yeah Jerry!!!

    Sent from my iPhone Typed on glass

    >

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