Tiny Home in Amsterdam

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Clad in wax-covered pine, this 645-square-foot dwelling is striking on the outside and endlessly charming on the inside.

When Marjon Helder and Martin Blankendaal commissioned Chris Collaris to redesign an old, decaying brick home on the waterfront in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the architect decided that starting from scratch—building a new, sustainable home of steel and wax-preserved pine—made more sense than a renovation. “The house was very old and could not be saved,” Collaris says. “[Starting over] gave us aesthetic freedom.”

 

Exterior, House Building Type, Wood Siding Material, and Gable RoofLine The compact home is clad with wax-covered pine that’s stained black. The architect employed an asymmetrical pitched roof with a dramatic overhang that helps to mitigate the sunlight that pours in through the large windows.

The compact home is clad with wax-covered pine that’s stained black. The architect employed an asymmetrical pitched roof with a dramatic overhang that helps to mitigate the sunlight that pours in through the large windows.

With a blank slate at his fingertips, the architect set out to create a design that would be as artful as it is practical. “It’s timber over a steel skeleton,” says Collaris, who clad the exterior walls and the sharply pitched roof with the same wax-preserved pine. “This made it sculptural,” he says. “The black finish gives it a slim profile despite the roof’s large overhang.

Exterior, House Building Type, Gable RoofLine, and Wood Siding Material Resident Marjon Helder stands against the black-stained vertical siding, which matches the cladding of the roof and creates a sculptural effect for the home.

Resident Marjon Helder stands against the black-stained vertical siding, which matches the cladding of the roof and creates a sculptural effect for the home.

Exterior, Gable RoofLine, House Building Type, and Wood Siding Material Three strategically placed large windows mark the home's front facade, and in combination with the vertical siding and the asymmetrical roofline, lend a graphic presence.

Three strategically placed large windows mark the home’s front facade, and in combination with the vertical siding and the asymmetrical roofline, lend a graphic presence.

In combination with the black finish on the walls and the roof, the asymmetrical form of the pitched roof gives the compact house a whimsical appearance. “It also allows for more volume,” Collaris says. High ceilings and an attic mark the interior, which is compact but notably airy.

 

Kitchen, Wood Cabinet, Wall Oven, Concrete Floor, Drop In Sink, and Cooktops The residents, Marjon Helder and Martin Blankendaal, salvaged wood from the previous house that stood on the lot and used it to craft the cabinetry in the kitchen. In the adjacent living room, oversize wood spools, once used to hold cable wire, serve as coffee tables. The Skyflyer pendants were designed in 1960 by Yki Nummi.

The residents, Marjon Helder and Martin Blankendaal, salvaged wood from the previous house that stood on the lot and used it to craft the cabinetry in the kitchen. In the adjacent living room, oversize wood spools, once used to hold cable wire, serve as coffee tables. The Skyflyer pendants were designed in 1960 by Yki Nummi.

Living Room, Chair, Concrete Floor, End Tables, and Ceiling Lighting In a corner of the living room, where concrete floors provide a minimalist aesthetic, a trio of pendants designed by Frederik Roije suspend near a Gispen 412 armchair and a glass side table, also designed by Frederik Roije. 

In a corner of the living room, where concrete floors provide a minimalist aesthetic, a trio of pendants designed by Frederik Roije suspend near a Gispen 412 armchair and a glass side table, also designed by Frederik Roije.

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