Andy Brown ~ June 28, 2020

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“It’s the Truth Even If It Didn’t Happen” Ken Kesey

 

Wally

Andy Brown passed away on his couch in Comox BC, June 28th.  His sons and his daughter, Alex, Max and Sally were with him as was his three legged Golden Retriever.  He was on the same sofa where his beloved wife and partner Alison Stocks had passed two weeks earlier.  

Heavy stuff, but true.

Some more true things:  

In 1980 or 81 Leslie Emerson sent Michael Lindsey on a winter course exchange to Northwest Outward Bound School.  There Lindsey met Andy Brown and a blonde hippie chick, climber named Sue (Lotus) Steele, who had recently arrived from Yosemite.  

This led Andy and Sue to Colorado.  There are great stories along that road, including when Andy and Lotus drove overland in southeast Utah because they had heard about this feature called Castleton Tower.  They had no information about routes or directions, but they identified the tower, drove to it and climbed it the next day.  Andy had not been in the US for long, even though some of his favorite things in the world were Elvis Presley and muscle cars … he had his doubts about safety.  Sue described a high level of paranoia about a Deliverance type encounter with locals in Utah the night before they climbed.

Andy and Lotus eventually arrived in safe territory however, “The Hill” in Boulder, Colorado when it was still in all it’s sixties to mid-eighties glory.  As was done in those days they traveled loosely with a group of friends mostly Brits in Andy’s case.  There were five main characters in this band with Sue being the only woman.  They resided on The Hill

One of the early house’s on The Hill had a really hideous bathroom that Sue finally got up the nerve to clean the filth then the next day they were evicted (for the filth?) so they went to the 3′ by 5′ card rental board at CU  and found this ad:

“Basement room with waterbed $140/month”

Perfect.  This was ‘The Peoples’ Army’

 

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el Commandante Brown at The People’s Army

 

The Lotus description. 

The People’s Army was a five bedroom, one bathroom house on the Hill.  It’s occupants were a PhD student, two Dead Heads and several others reprobates who came and went.  Andy loved the place because it had a huge bookcase filled with record albums and all of the people were super nice.  We lived there until our April departure to Joshua Tree.  Most of those people are still close friends.

 

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The photo is of the kitchen, weird stuff on the walls and cabinets to groove over – of course lots of pot & psychedelics were always around.

 

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Andy and Sue/Lotus prepping for their next adventure

 

 

106391934_10217168820356884_5617482132083244657_o.jpg Lindsey, Lotus and Andy at the Prince Phillip Fundraiser for OB in October 1987

 

Wally

Michael Lindsey told me about Andy Brown who he said would be “a great winter course instructor.”  I agreed because I soon learned that Andy’s skiing abilities were worse than mine but he had a tolerance for cold and misery in the mountains that matched mine and he liked to laugh which was the bonus.

 

 

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Just the beginning because Andy Brown and Lotus soon became property owners in Leadville, Colorado after they bought a trailer for $875 at a place called Lazy Acres. Perfect …  

 

 

andybrown 2.jpgAndy Brown trained two border collies to be avalanche dogs, Owen pictured here and Copper, who worked in Idaho and Canada.  Andy’s youngest son, Max told me the other day that they finally sold out and got a golden retriever, the dog who was with Andy when he passed.

 

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Andy being tortured by beautiful women.

And we will introduce a young British Outward Bound intern named Alison Stocks (top left) ) who would go on to medical school at DU and become Andy’s saddle pal with three kids in their future.

 

~~~

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The Brown crew visiting Canmore Alberta in the younger days

 

Wally

 

Andy ended up with an exceptionally high degree of professional respect as only he could.  I found out that he was hired as Director at Pebble Creek ski patrol.  Kelllie and Jeff Rhodes praise the way he upgraded the whole operation.  And he supported his family working as a paramedic after Ali had to stop working as a doc. But those colorful Colorado times will not be forgotten by those who knew Andy.  We’re sure gonna miss you.

~~~

 

“When the legend becomes fact, print the legend” from director John Ford’s Western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

 

The contributors to the story are:

Wally Berg

Susan Steele

Micheal Lindsey

Kellie Erwin

Roger Peart

Sam Parker

and a couple more

 

RoberRepor-email-sig2

89 former Defense officials: The military must never be used to violate constitutional rights ~ The Washington Post

How a 200-year-old law allows Trump to threaten states with military intervention

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June 5, 2020

President Trump continues to use inflammatory language as many Americans protest the unlawful death of George Floyd and the unjust treatment of black Americans by our justice system. As the protests have grown, so has the intensity of the president’s rhetoric. He has gone so far as to make a shocking promise: to send active-duty members of the U.S. military to “dominate” protesters in cities throughout the country — with or without the consent of local mayors or state governors.

On Monday, the president previewed his approach on the streets of Washington. He had 1,600 troops from around the country transported to the D.C. area, and placed them on alert, as an unnamed Pentagon official put it, “to ensure faster employment if necessary.” As part of the show of force that Trump demanded, military helicopters made low-level passes over peaceful protesters — a military tactic sometimes used to disperse enemy combatants — scattering debris and broken glass among the crowd. He also had a force, including members of the National Guard and federal officers, that used flash-bang grenades, pepper spray and, according to eyewitness accounts, rubber bullets to drive lawful protesters, as well as members of the media and clergy, away from the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church. All so he could hold a politically motivated photo op there with members of his team, including, inappropriately, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Looting and violence are unacceptable acts, and perpetrators should be arrested and duly tried under the law. But as Monday’s actions near the White House demonstrated, those committing such acts are largely on the margins of the vast majority of predominantly peaceful protests. While several past presidents have called on our armed services to provide additional aid to law enforcement in times of national crisis — among them Ulysses S. Grant, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson — these presidents used the military to protect the rights of Americans, not to violate them.

As former leaders in the Defense Department — civilian and military, Republican, Democrat and independent — we all took an oath upon assuming office “to support and defend the Constitution of the United States,” as did the president and all members of the military, a fact that Gen. Milley pointed out in a recent memorandum to members of the armed forces. We are alarmed at how the president is betraying this oath by threatening to order members of the U.S. military to violate the rights of their fellow Americans.

President Trump has given governors a stark choice: either end the protests that continue to demand equal justice under our laws, or expect that he will send active-duty military units into their states. While the Insurrection Actgives the president the legal authority to do so, this authority has been invoked only in the most extreme conditions when state or local authorities were overwhelmed and were unable to safeguard the rule of law. Historically, as Secretary Esper has pointed out, it has rightly been seen as a tool of last resort.

Beyond being unnecessary, using our military to quell protests across the country would also be unwise. This is not the mission our armed forces signed up for: They signed up to fight our nation’s enemies and to secure — not infringe upon — the rights and freedoms of their fellow Americans. In addition, putting our servicemen and women in the middle of politically charged domestic unrest risks undermining the apolitical nature of the military that is so essential to our democracy. It also risks diminishing Americans’ trust in our military — and thus America’s security — for years to come.

Leon E. Panetta, former defense secretary

Chuck Hagel, former defense secretary

Ashton B. Carter, former defense secretary

William S. Cohen, former defense secretary

Sasha Baker, former deputy chief of staff to the defense secretary

Jeremy Bash, chief of staff to the defense secretary

Jeffrey P. Bialos, former deputy under secretary of defense for industrial affairs

Susanna V. Blume, former deputy chief of staff to the deputy defense secretary

Ian Brzezinski, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Europe and NATO

Gabe Camarillo, former assistant secretary of the Air Force

Kurt M. Campbell, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Asia and the Pacific

Michael Carpenter, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia

Rebecca Bill Chavez, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Western hemisphere affairs

Derek Chollet, former assistant defense secretary for international security affairs

Dan Christman, retired lieutenant general in the U.S. Army and former assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Eliot A. Cohen, former member of planning staff for the defense department and former member of the Defense Policy Board

Erin Conaton, former under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness

John Conger, former principal deputy under secretary of defense

Peter S. Cooke, retired major general of the U.S. Army Reserve

Richard Danzig, former secretary of the U.S. Navy

Janine Davidson, former under secretary of the U.S. Navy

Robert L. Deitz, former general counsel at the National Security Agency

Abraham M. Denmark, former deputy assistant defense secretary for East Asia

Michael B. Donley, former secretary of the U.S. Air Force

John W. Douglass, retired brigadier general in the U.S. Air Force and former assistant secretary of the U.S. Navy

Eric Edelman, former under secretary of defense for policy

Eric Fanning, former secretary of the U.S. Army

Evelyn N. Farkas, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia

Michèle A. Flournoy, former under secretary of defense for policy

Nelson M. Ford, former under secretary of the U.S. Army

Alice Friend, former principal director for African affairs in the office of the under defense secretary for policy

John A. Gans Jr., former speechwriter for the defense secretary

Sherri Goodman, former deputy under secretary of defense for environmental security

André Gudger, former deputy assistant defense secretary for manufacturing and industrial base policy

Robert Hale, former under secretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller

Mark Hertling, retired lieutenant general in the U.S. Army and former commanding general of U.S. Army Europe

Kathleen H. Hicks, former principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy

Deborah Lee James, former secretary of the U.S. Air Force

John P. Jumper, retired general of the U.S. Air Force and former chief of staff of the Air Force

Colin H. Kahl, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Middle East policy

Mara E. Karlin, former deputy assistant defense secretary for strategy and force development

Frank Kendall, former under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics

Susan Koch, former deputy assistant defense secretary for threat-reduction policy

Ken Krieg, former under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics

Steven J. Lepper, retired major general of the U.S. Air Force

George Little, former Pentagon press secretary

William J. Lynn III, former deputy defense secretary

Ray Mabus, former secretary of the U.S. Navy and former governor of Mississippi

Kelly Magsamen, former principal deputy assistant defense secretary for Asian and Pacific security affairs

Carlos E. Martinez, retired brigadier general of the U.S. Air Force Reserve

Michael McCord, former under secretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller

Chris Mellon, former deputy assistant defense secretary for intelligence

James N. Miller, former under secretary of defense for policy

Edward T. Morehouse Jr., former principal deputy assistant defense secretary and former acting assistant defense secretary for operational energy plans and programs

Jennifer M. O’Connor, former general counsel of the Defense Department

Sean O’Keefe, former secretary of the U.S. Navy

Dave Oliver, former principal deputy under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics

Robert B. Pirie, former under secretary of the U.S. Navy

John Plumb, former acting deputy assistant defense secretary for space policy

Eric Rosenbach, former assistant defense secretary for homeland defense and global security

Deborah Rosenblum, former acting deputy assistant defense secretary for counternarcotics

Todd Rosenblum, acting assistant defense secretary for homeland defense and Americas’ security affairs

Tommy Ross, former deputy assistant defense secretary for security cooperation

Henry J. Schweiter, former deputy assistant defense secretary

David B. Shear, former assistant defense secretary for Asian and Pacific security affairs

Amy E. Searight, former deputy assistant defense secretary for South and Southeast Asia

Vikram J. Singh, former deputy assistant defense secretary for South and Southeast Asia

Julianne Smith, former deputy national security adviser to the vice president and former principal director for Europe and NATO policy

Paula Thornhill, retired brigadier general of the Air Force and former principal director for Near Eastern and South Asian affairs

Jim Townsend, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Europe and NATO policy

Sandy Vershbow, former assistant defense secretary for international security affairs

Michael Vickers, former under secretary of defense for intelligence

Celeste Wallander, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia

Andrew Weber, former assistant defense secretary for nuclear, chemical and biological defense programs

William F. Wechsler, former deputy assistant defense secretary for special operations and combating terrorism

Doug Wilson, former assistant defense secretary for public affairs

Anne A. Witkowsky, former deputy assistant defense secretary for stability and humanitarian affairs

Douglas Wise, former deputy director of the Defense Intelligence Agency

Daniel P. Woodward, retired brigadier general of the U.S. Air Force

Margaret H. Woodward, retired major general of the U.S. Air Force

Carl Woog, former deputy assistant to the defense secretary for communications

Robert O. Work, former deputy defense secretary

Dov S. Zakheim, former under secretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller

Christo, artist known for massive, fleeting displays, dies ~ LA Times

Christo at Lake Iseo

The artist Christo walks on his monumental installation “The Floating Piers” in northern Italy during a press preview.
(Filippo Monteforte / AFP)

 

Christo, known for his massive, ephemeral public arts projects, died Sunday at his home in New York. He was 84.

His death was announced on Twitter and the artist’s web page. No cause of death was given.

Along with late wife Jeanne-Claude, the artists’ careers were defined by their ambitious art projects that quickly disappeared soon after they were erected.

In 2005, he installed more than 7,500 vinyl gates in New York’s Central Park and wrapped the Reichstag in Berlin in fabric with an aluminum sheen in 1995. Their self-financed $26-million “Umbrellas” project erected 1,340 blue umbrellas installed in Japan and 1,760 blue umbrellas in Southern California in 1991.

The statement said the artist’s next project, “L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped,” is slated to appear in September in Paris as planned. An exhibition about Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s work is also scheduled to run from July through October at the Centre Pompidou.

“Christo lived his life to the fullest, not only dreaming up what seemed impossible but realizing it,” his office said in a statement. “Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s artwork brought people together in shared experiences across the globe, and their work lives on in our hearts and memories.”

LA CASE Books@LACASEBooks

RIP Christo

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Born in Bulgaria in 1935, Christo Vladimirov Javacheff studied at the Fine Arts Academy in Sofia before moving to Prague, Czech Republic, in 1957, then Vienna, then Geneva. It was in Paris in 1958 where he met Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon, who would become his partner in life and art.

Jeanne-Claude died in 2009 at age 74 from complications of a brain aneurysm.

~~~

 

Christo, Artist Who Wrapped and Festooned on an Epic Scale, Dies at 84 ~ NYT

Mountains, museums, bridges and Central Park were just some of what he used to make astonishing and popular art with his wife and collaborator, Jeanne-Claude.

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Credit…Andrea Frazzetta for The New York Times

Christo, the Bulgarian-born conceptual artist who turned to epic-scale environmental works in the late 1960s, stringing a giant curtain across a mountain pass in Colorado, wrapping the Pont Neuf in Paris and the Reichstag in Berlin and zigzagging thousands of saffron-curtained gates throughout Central Park, died on Sunday at his home in New York City. He was 84.

His death was announced on his official Facebook page. No cause was specified.

Christo — he used only his first name — was an artistic Pied Piper. His grand projects, often decades in the making and all of them temporary, required the cooperation of dozens, sometimes hundreds, of landowners, government officials, judges, environmental groups, local residents, engineers and workers, many of whom had little interest in art and a deep reluctance to see their lives and their surroundings disrupted by an eccentric visionary speaking in only semi-comprehensible English.

Again and again, Christo prevailed, through persistence, charm and a childlike belief that eventually everyone would see things the way he did.

At his side, throughout, was his wife, Jeanne-Claude, who, like her husband, used only her first name. In the mid-1990s she began sharing equal billing with him on all their projects, formalizing what the couple insisted had been their practice all along. She died in 2009.

“The Gates,” Christo’s Central Park project, typified his approach. Like nearly all his projects, it began with a drawing, executed in 1979. Then came the seemingly eternal round of lobbying public officials, filing forms, waiting for environmental impact studies, speaking at hearings, rallying support. All of this, Christo insisted, was part of the art work.

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Credit…Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

 

“For me esthetics is everything involved in the process — the workers, the politics, the negotiations, the construction difficulty, the dealings with hundreds of people,” he told The New York Times in 1972. “The whole process becomes an esthetic — that’s what I’m interested in, discovering the process. I put myself in dialogue with other people.”

When New York’s parks commissioner at the time, Gordon J. Davis, rejected “The Gates” in 1981, setting forth his reasons in a book-length document, Christo simply incorporated the rebuff into the project. “I find it very inspiring in a way that is like abstract poetry,” he told the College Art Association. “He adds a dimension to the work, no matter what he thinks.”

Given the go-ahead by the administration of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, “The Gates” was finally installed in February 2005. For two weeks, thousands of strollers wandering 23 miles of the park’s pathways passed underneath 7,503 steel frames supporting free-hanging panels of saffron-colored fabric. It was a stunning success.

 

Happy 79th Birthday Bob! 

“I’d like to be able to hit a hundred-mile-an-hour baseball. But you have to know your place.” – Dylan
“Sometimes it’s not enough to know what things mean, sometimes you have to know what things don’t mean.” –  Dylan
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Ginsberg and Dylan at the grave of Jack Kerouac. They’ve all been badly imitated, but there’s only one Dylan, one Ginsberg and one Kerouac.

Pisco Dreams

Caballeros y señora

went to tienda de botellas to buy a bottle of Capel for mango sours and the sweet young lady said “I’m glad you finally showed up.”

I said “thank you, but why are you glad”, knowing she was obviously mistaking me for someone else …

she told me i had ordered the case of Alto del Carmen months ago and they never heard from me again (imagine that?)

but were holding the case for me ….

I had just called them this morning ordering a case of Carmen … must have been lost in translation …  or maybe some kind of alcoholic syncronicity.

anyway, i’ve got 10 bottles of very good pisco for the price of the Capel.

Stop by for a pisco or mango sour

rŌbert

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Four Dead in Ohio – Kent State 50 years ago

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~~~  LISTEN  ~~~

In a program first broadcast on the BBC, Four Dead in Ohio tells the story of the Kent State Massacre, May 4th 1970. On that day the National Guard opened fire on several hundred students at Kent State University in northeastern Ohio. Four were killed, nine wounded. Two weeks later, two more students were gunned down at Jackson State in MIssissippi. IN this documentary built around sound recorded at Kent on the day and other sources, and interviews with survivors, Michael Goldfarb tells the story of the killings. he looks at how the event still influences politics and protest in an America as divided now as it was on that day.