Old t-shirts never (almost never) die

Ellen Stein sent me this photo of her ancient CAIC  fundraising T-shirt from late in the last century that was about to become an automotive rag  …. The photo captures a couple ‘hog ridin’ fools’ crawling through avalanche debris from one of the major slide paths at the Mule Shoe turn in Chattanooga just on the south side of RMP.  I think it was Telescope that had run … Thanks Ellen.

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The Nuyorican Poets Café, A Cauldron for Poetry And Politics

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The Nuyorican Poets Cafe remains a wildly diverse venue influenced by its mostly Puerto Rican founders who claimed it as a site of artistry and resistance in 1973.

Courtesy of Nuyorican Poets Cafe

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In the heart of an ever-gentrifying New York City neighborhood, the Nuyorican Poets Café was once called “the most integrated place on the planet” by none other than Beat poet Allen Ginsberg. Today it remains a wildly diverse venue still influenced by its mostly Puerto Rican founders who claimed it as a site of artistry and resistance in 1973.

Poet and founder Miguel Algarín and his artist friends just wanted a place to get together to create. By the 1990s, the Café was the epicenter of Slam Poetry in the country.

With its focus on spoken word, and slam poetry in particular (though it also hosts hip-hop, rap, and Latin jazz artists), the Café embodies the belief that anyone can take the stage and interpret one of the most accessible art forms. “The philosophy and purpose of the Nuyorican Poets Café has always been to reveal poetry as a living art,” Algarín wrote in the anthology Aloud: Voices from the Nuyorican Poets Café.

That feeling remains.

On a recent Open Mic night, for example, audiences were treated to a raunchy stand-up set about girls with big body parts by a tall Haitian man, a convulsive spit session by a wiry New Zealander, a rap performance about coffee and water that elicited plenty of hollering, and a moving socially conscious piece called “Don’t Do That” that felt like a woke listicle come alive thanks to its thumping beats. “Let’s all do the best to not elect a reptile,” the performer intoned, “and don’t do any drugs made in the 80s.” It even called out the rampant homophobia that often greets provocative rap performers: “Don’t say no homo; we’re all gay as f*ck.”

The crowds at the Café, through their loud clapping, peppery snaps, sarcastic hollers, and delighted screams during performances, creates one of the most welcoming spots in all of New York City. In the words of poet Portia Bartley, who was featured in a recent Poetry Slam night and who was a regular before moving to Los Angeles, the Café “speaks to the marginalized, to anyone who’s usually not granted a safe space to express themselves and speak on their experiences.”

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The crowds at the Café, through their loud clapping, peppery snaps, sarcastic hollers, and delighted screams during performances, creates one of the most welcoming spots in all of New York City.

Courtesy of Nuyorican Cafe

~~~  READ ON  ~~~

~ TIM’S LANE ~ you just knew he was gonna be a legend ~ Rōbert ~ Update with funny email exchange …

 

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~~~  WATCH TIM’S LANE  ~~~

email from Tim Lane to Mike Friedman and Rōbert this morning, 2/25/16..     Hola …Watched Tim’s Lane today (in Chile)… laughed a lot …don’t think I ever skied that shot …all the best, Tim

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email response from Mike Friedman…  There’s a line in the Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, “when the legend becomes fact, print the legend”.

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email from Rōbert…   So it goes… “I know it’s true, even if it didn’t happen.”  Mark Twain

~ la puerta del misterio ~

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A UPI article

After nearly 15 years of investigation into the disapearance of US goverment material near Silverton Colorado …several of these articles were found in a small mountain comunity in the central Chilian Andes, tacked to the door of a rundown hut. Authorities still remain baffled. President and founder of the Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies, Chris Laundry commented, ” We’ve exhausted every lead ..even as far as Gulmorg on the Kashmir-Pakistan border. These signs and their investigation has cost the American taxpayer dearly …which almost brought our project to its knees.” The US embassy in Santiago is looking into this matter and hasn’t ruled out bringing in the FBI.

‘RED MOUNTAIN PASS – CHIEF OURAY HIGHWAY: A History of Forecasting and Mitigation.’—Jerry Roberts—The Avalanche Review

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The Avalanche Review, February & April 2009

It’s anybody’s guess why forecasters do this job. It could be the smell of powder, throwing 50 pound shots from the helicopter, watching hard slab failure release energy over several alpine basins at once, or maybe just the company you keep.

Whatever the reasons, you get hooked on the excitement and the challenges of the job. It requires a lot of field experience (series of non-fatal errors), collection of empirical evidence, listening to your inner voice (intuition), and distilling all of the variables to reduce uncertainties until you can finally make a decision that you can live with. There are many truths to be learned. It’s no big mystery; you pay attention and do your work because you don’t want to be a victim of your own bad planning. It helps to be comfortable in the world of uncertainties.

READ FULL ARTICLE  PART I    PP. 24,25,32…       READ PART II  PP. 30-32