NEW MEXICAN PRAYER FLAGS & A MORNING WITH GEORGIA

the Spruce is up for sale .. a package liquor store with 4 bar stools, a nice place to hang out …

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Georgia opened her studio for our painting class about 9.

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then found the brushes and paint

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we had carne adovada for lunch on the roof then walked across the street to El Piñon 

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& sipped a few Embudo Green Chile beers at the Piñon after class but before church of course.

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Mary’s after class

A COLLECTOR WHO FILLS HIS LOS ANGELES HOME WITH CAREFULLY SOURCED CLUTTER ~ NYT

Jonathan Pessin has stuffed his apartment with the fruits of his obsessive search for the “best, weirdest version” of seemingly everything.

The objects and furniture dealer Jonathan Pessin’s eclectic collection overflows into his Los Angeles home. In the dining area, from left: a six-foot fiberglass Coke bottle, circa 1970s-80s; an Alexander Calder-esque multicolored metal hanging fish sculpture; a painting by the artist and furniture picker Robert Loughlin, drawn with Sharpie on the back of a vintage painting; an industrial metal cabinet in original green paint with red handles that holds smaller items; and a life-size papier-mâché sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. An amateur metal sculpture of Darth Vader sits atop the cabinet.
The objects and furniture dealer Jonathan Pessin’s eclectic collection overflows into his Los Angeles home. In the dining area, from left: a six-foot fiberglass Coke bottle, circa 1970s-80s; an Alexander Calder-esque multicolored metal hanging fish sculpture; a painting by the artist and furniture picker Robert Loughlin, drawn with Sharpie on the back of a vintage painting; an industrial metal cabinet in original green paint with red handles that holds smaller items; and a life-size papier-mâché sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. An amateur metal sculpture of Darth Vader sits atop the cabinet.Credit…Philip Cheung

By Kurt Soller

Photographs by Philip Cheung

IT HAD TAKEN several months of scouring flea markets before Jonathan Pessin finally found the weathered, hollow fiberglass Coke bottle that now stands sentry between the dining and kitchen areas of his loft in Los Angeles’s industrial Frogtown neighborhood. Reportedly produced by the Coca-Cola Company circa the 1970s or 1980s, the six-foot-tall sculpture was one that Pessin, a collector and dealer of strange objects and furniture, says he had been “thinking about seriously” for quite some time, a kind of white whale in his yearslong pursuit of tracking down various quotidian items rendered in Claes Oldenburg-like proportions. He’d recently lost out on a plastic rotary phone fit for a giant (“It still haunts me,” he says), though who knows where it might have gone in a 1,500-square-foot space already overstuffed with a to-scale sculpture of the Modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe; a massive leather chair modeled on the glove of the legendary Yankees center fielder Joe DiMaggio; a human eye-shaped bowling ball that lolls on Pessin’s couch in place of a throw pillow; and a papier-mâché Ticonderoga pencil, nearly as long and yellow as a school bus, that lines the balcony railing of the bedroom upstairs. There, lying across the duvet, is a pair of jeans so large, it makes the mattress seem as if it’s taken off its own pants.

In Pessin’s living room, a circa 1970s-80s painting inspired by the Richard Diebenkorn “Ocean Park” series hangs over a 1970s B&B Italia Diesis leather sofa and three fiberglass faux boulders.
In Pessin’s living room, a circa 1970s-80s painting inspired by the Richard Diebenkorn “Ocean Park” series hangs over a 1970s B&B Italia Diesis leather sofa and three fiberglass faux boulders. Credit…Philip Cheung
A lip painting after Tom Wesselmann and a group of hanging wire sculptures after Ruth Asawa hang over a brass-riveted Sarreid-style three-panel room divider and a pair of 11-foot vintage Sedgefield jeans on Pessin’s bed.Credit…Philip Cheung

“I want the best, weirdest version of something, and I want to live my life like I’m in a sculpture garden,” says Pessin, 51. He glances down from the sleeping alcove into a raw open-plan apartment with 22-foot-high, wood-beamed ceilings that’s filled wall to wall with his many aesthetic fixations: Before his oversize phase — which he’s now renouncing, having noticed ironically large objects becoming trendy in design circles and online — there was the tangential-but-different papier-mâché one. Prior to that, he collected art with donkey iconography, including a beat-up painting in his stairway punctured with two bullet holes that “supposedly hung in a Mexican bar, where they used to get drunk and shoot at it,” he says. Over the years, he’s accumulated several heavily patinated brass Rubik’s Cubes, an assortment of coin-operated kiddie rides and myriad hand-shaped sculptures in plaster or wood. Lately, he’s into perforated metal pieces and bringing outdoor furniture inside, whether the towering cactus-shaped planters that flank his 1970s B&B Italia white leather sofa, or the trio of textured fiberglass boulders that serve as his coffee table — for now, at least, until he once again rearranges the hundreds of wares within his home. (His friend the Los Angeles-based designer Pamela Shamshiri sometimes helps.) “I buy ridiculous things, but I like to think my taste is evolving,” he says. “In a way, this loft is like the inside of my brain.”

A vintage papier-mâché sculptural chair in Pessin’s NFS showroom.
A vintage papier-mâché sculptural chair in Pessin’s NFS showroom.Credit…Philip Cheung
On the wall, from left to right: a painting of Paul Stanley from the band Kiss, a biomorphic diamond-plate-framed mirror and a large canvas painting in the style of Frank Stella. Below: a green Jean Prouvé-esque welder’s worktable, a giant copper mushroom and a geometric wooden chair.

Pessin never intended to have this much stuff. Nearly a decade ago, he began building his object library — best viewed, perhaps, as a collection of many subcollections, worthy of its own cataloging system, not that he’ll ever be that organized — after falling for the thrill of the chase, that sense of unexpected discovery, at flea markets like the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. He now shows up before sunrise, flashlight in hand, ready to race through its hundreds of stalls as the doors open at 5 a.m., hoping to snatch up treasure before the other pirates. This quest led him to estate sales, junk shops, art auctions and prop houses, where he’s always searching for an acquisition that might “somehow fill the hole in my heart,” he jokes, “though it rarely does.” And yet living with clutter may have always been his destiny: As a child in Brookline, Mass., he collected rocks, went antiquing with his mother, rarely missed “The Price Is Right” — even today, he prides himself on knowing how much something should cost, a skill that proves useful when haggling — and slept in a converted closet under the stairs, which he says prepared him for the series of flexible, atypical Los Angeles dwellings that he’s inhabited since he moved to the city in his 20s to work in the film industry. “I gravitate toward heavy things and metal things, and I’m sure that has to do with some sort of permanence,” he says. “Glass makes me nervous. Ceramics make me nervous.”

In the main room of Pessin’s loft, a Loughlin “Brute” painting on a giant fiberglass foot. A vintage pine shelving unit holds an eclectic array of sculptures, objects and artworks.
In the main room of Pessin’s loft, a Loughlin “Brute” painting on a giant fiberglass foot. A vintage pine shelving unit holds an eclectic array of sculptures, objects and artworks.Credit…Philip Cheung
A faux Piet Mondrian painting above a giant rotating Rubik’s Cube dresser, a carved wooden sculpture of a hand making a peace sign and an oversized pair of Converse rodeo clown shoes.
A faux Piet Mondrian painting above a giant rotating Rubik’s Cube dresser, a carved wooden sculpture of a hand making a peace sign and an oversized pair of Converse rodeo clown shoes.Credit…Philip Cheung

NOT LONG AFTER Pessin became a staple on the collecting circuit, he had amassed enough inventory to become a dealer himself. At the time, he was mostly focused on the kinds of small objects and quirky knickknacks that now crowd his own tables and bookcases, as well as anonymous art, unsigned works that might — though probably not — have been made by a master, or just someone talented enough to create something visually interesting or at least replicate something well known. In Pessin’s home office, tucked into a nook under his staircase, there’s a verdigris Jean Prouvé-esque desk beneath a wall-hugging facsimile of a geometric Frank Stella painting. He also owns works reminiscent of those by Ruth AsawaPiet MondrianAlexander CalderRichard Diebenkorn and many others; when he once tried to get a wooden sculpture authenticated by an auction house via representatives of the Colombian sculptor Fernando Botero, the artist himself wrote back in all caps that the piece wasn’t his, only further arousing Pessin’s suspicions.

In Pessin’s bedroom, a kinetic metal sculpture hangs over a Prouvé-style iron desk and a Brutalist brass table. Other objects include sculptures of an astronaut and Godzilla, a wall mirror in the form of a pack of cigarettes, a Loughlin painting and oversized versions of a wall outlet, a pencil and a dollar sign.
In Pessin’s bedroom, a kinetic metal sculpture hangs over a Prouvé-style iron desk and a Brutalist brass table. Other objects include sculptures of an astronaut and Godzilla, a wall mirror in the form of a pack of cigarettes, a Loughlin painting and oversized versions of a wall outlet, a pencil and a dollar sign.Credit…Philip Cheung
Sculptures and furnishings in the NFS showroom, including a pair of Ron Arad-style metal ribbon chairs, a torch-cut steel room divider, a giant concrete hand holding chrome balls and a folk art wood table with a carved foot, hand and mouth with braces.
Sculptures and furnishings in the NFS showroom, including a pair of Ron Arad-style metal ribbon chairs, a torch-cut steel room divider, a giant concrete hand holding chrome balls and a folk art wood table with a carved foot, hand and mouth with braces.Credit…Philip Cheung

As his name and collection grew, top interior designers such as Kelly Wearstler and Sally Breer also took notice; he soon began selling them art and furniture for their projects. “His perspective is so refreshing and irreverent,” says Breer. “He’s not precious, and he’s got a sense of humor, but there’s also a refined elegance to how he appreciates quality.” Pessin’s hobby had, in effect, become a full-time enterprise. He named it NFS, after the industry term “not for sale,” referencing his own habit of inquiring about items that other dealers weren’t willing to let go. At first, he sold directly from his own loft, which he moved into in 2014; he’s since taken over both an adjacent showroom and overflow storage space from artists who’ve given up their studios within the complex, a maze of low, gray stucco warehouses that were built around the 1940s. The only problem, Pessin says, is he “sometimes experiences pangs of pain” when a customer tries to purchase a piece he’s not ready to relinquish. And there are certain items that are, indeed, NFS, notably his series of works by the late 20th-century artist and designer Robert Loughlin. Employed by both Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat as a picker at New York’s flea markets and vintage stores, Loughlin repeatedly painted the same strong-jawed, cigarette-smoking beefcake visage on mugs, tables, chairs and other surfaces. As the lore goes, his eye was so discerning, he once found a genuine Salvador Dalí painting for $40 that later sold at Sotheby’s for $78,000, which perhaps explains Pessin’s fascination.

“I connect with things more than I connect with people,” Pessin says, pointing out several of his Loughlins. “But I don’t want to have to have so many things.” Still, he can’t seem to help himself — he shops seven days a week — and, really, what’s the harm in that? All this stuff will continue to glut our planet whether he buys it or not. And in an era that fetishizes minimalism, upcycling and constant self-optimization, the collector’s life is a reminder that there is, in fact, no moral imperative to the accrual or disavowal of objects. There are merely those who enjoy things — and those who don’t.

Photo assistant: Andy Cullen

Video OF Republican congresswoman (BOOBERT) making racist remarks about colleague AND OTHER INSULTS ~ CNN

Rep. Lauren Boebert, tweeted out an apology to the Muslim Community after video showed Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-CO) making anti-Muslim remarks in reference to Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN).

~~~ WATCH ~~~

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Lauren Boebert apologizes to Muslims after her remarks about Ilhan Omar

The Council on American-Islamic Relations condemned Boebert’s remarks and urged Republican leaders to repudiate Boebert’s remarks.

Lauren Boebert apologizes to Muslims after her remarks about Ilhan Omar
The Council on American-Islamic Relations condemned Boebert’s remarks and urged Republican leaders to repudiate Boebert’s remarks.

By James Anderson, The Associated Press

DENVER — Colorado Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert apologized Friday for using anti-Muslim language in describing a recent encounter she had with Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

In her apology, Boebert didn’t address Omar’s criticism that Boebert made up her story about the encounter at the U.S. Capitol.

Boebert tweeted that “I apologize to anyone in the Muslim community I offended with my comment about Rep. Omar. I have reached out to her office to speak with her directly. There are plenty of policy differences to focus on without this unnecessary distraction.”

According to a video clip posted by a Twitter account called PatriotTakes, Boebert made the remarks this holiday break. In it, she says she and a staffer were taking a Capitol elevator when she saw an alarmed Capitol police officer running toward them. She said she turned to her left and spotted Omar standing beside them.

“”Well, she doesn’t have a backpack. We should be fine,” Boebert recalled saying, drawing laughs from her audience. “And I said, ‘Oh look, the jihad squad decided to show up for work today.’”

“Fact, this buffoon looks down when she sees me at the Capitol, this whole story is made up,” Omar tweeted late Thursday. “Sad she thinks bigotry gets her clout.”

“Anti-Muslim bigotry isn’t funny and shouldn’t be normalized,” Omar continued. “Congress can’t be a place where hateful and dangerous Muslim tropes get no condemnation.”

Telephone calls and emails seeking comment from Boebert and Omar weren’t immediately returned Friday.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations condemned Boebert’s remarks in a Friday statement urging GOP House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy and other Republican leaders to repudiate Boebert’s remarks.

It said Boebert’s allusion to a backpack is an “Islamophobic smear that all Muslims are terrorists,” as well as her use of the term “jihad squad.”

Edward Ahmed Mitchell, CAIR’s national deputy director, told CNN Friday that “to make this disgusting joke, misuse an Islamic term, is beyond the pale.” Mitchell explained that “jihad” is a sacred term referring to “any struggle taken up for the sake of God,” including charity work and fighting for social justice.

Omar and Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib sometimes refer to themselves as “the squad.”

VETERAN ANTI-CONSUMERIST CRUSADER REVEREND BILLY TAKES AIM AT CLIMATE CHANGE ~ NPR

November 26, 2021

JON KALISH

~~~ LISTEN ~~~

For more than 20 years the performance artist known as Reverend Billy — real name, Bill Talen — has been crusading against consumerism in New York and abroad. I first met him in early 2000, when I recorded his attempt to exorcise a cash register in the Disney Store on Times Square. 

“People, tourists, listen to me,” Reverend Billy called out in the flagship store. “Mickey Mouse is the anti-Christ. This is the devil!”

Chain stores, especially Starbucks, were the targets of the Reverend Billy’s wrath as he railed against “the sea of identical details.” He blamed them for destroying mom-and-pop businesses all over America. Back then, Talen was known to enlist audience members in political actions. I followed members of one throng as they marched to a Manhattan parking lot, where a billboard deemed an affront to the neighborhood was defaced using paintball guns.

After the economic meltdown in 2008, Talen shifted much of his focus to the climate crisis. The fake clergyman remains the spiritual leader of the Church of Stop Shopping, and in November celebrates 20 years of musical anti-consumerist crusading in a New York City concert with his Stop Shopping Choir. But he now refers to the Earth as “our religion.” He launched a podcast, and in a video posted on YouTube he stands at a lectern in the ocean, preaching about extreme weather.

~~~ WATCH ~~~

“The globe is warming and it is human-caused!” he preaches, water up to his knees. “This wet, white and blue spinning rock in space that is our home is in grave danger.” As the sermon progresses, the sea does, too, rising up to his waist, then his chest.

Firms like British Petroleum now serve as the Reverend’s foils. At the Tate Modern in London, he exorcized BP, which had underwritten an exhibit. Protesters dumped gooey black theatrical oil over his Elvis pompadour, and it dripped down to his trademark white suit. 

“Climate change! Climate change! Climate change!” he shouted in a cavernous section of the museum, his voice ringing with urgency. Though he intentionally smeared a BP logo on a wall with the black goo, Talen was not detained. He says he’s never been arrested in the U.K., though he claims police followed him constantly during a nine-city tour earlier this month.

Talen, 71, estimates he’s been arrested elsewhere more than 50 times over the last two decades—always in his clerical collar, along with a leisure-suit wardrobe expanded to include shades of neon pink, orange and green. His longest jail stay was three days in California. During the pandemic, he was arrested for trespassing at a field hospital in Central Park set up by an anti-gay religious group.

Sometimes Talen keeps the clerical collar on even when he’s not performing. Over the years, he’s started assuming pastoral duties, presiding at hundreds of weddings, baptisms and even funerals. “People pulled me into rituals,” he says. “I was at first just following what people were telling me to do, in a sort of state of amazement. But now I’m just helping wherever I can.”

Talen has a knack for conveying spiritual sincerity to both his audiences and the dozens of people in the Stop Shopping Choir, says Alisa Solomon, a veteran journalist and Columbia University professor, who edited the 2011 book The Reverend Billy Project

“There’s a tendency at first to look at Reverend Billy and say, ‘Oh, yeah. We know this joke: Here’s a guy who’s making fun of the Jimmy Swaggarts,'” Solomon says. “But he’s not just making fun of the preacher role; he’s making use of it. Reverend Billy is not a role that he just puts on and plays: he really is Reverend Billy.”

Solomon cites Talen’s wife, Savitri D. — Talen refers to her as the director of the Church of Stop Shopping — for the dramaturgical shaping of the group’s public actions. “Their events are highly choreographed,” Solomon notes. “There are plans for where the choir is going to stand, when they’re going to sing, when Billy is going to bust out into a sermon.”

That as many as 25 members of the Stop Shopping Choir continued to rehearse in Brooklyn during the pandemic, Savitri D. explains, prepared the group well for its recent British invasion. “During COVID, we met on a rooftop and sang in masks for three hours, week after week, in all kinds of weather,” she says. “We were able to tour in the U.K. and be a really coherent ensemble because we never stopped singing together.”

The choir was bolstered by several members of its satellite chorus in the U.K., and supported by a grant from the British Arts Council. The tour concluded in Glasgow during the COP26 Summit, though its final performance was cancelled after a member tested positive for COVID.

~~~ WATCH ~~~

Some members of the Stop Shopping Choir have sung in the group for a decade or longer, according to musical director Gregory Corbino. Veterans say it’s like a second family. The ensemble includes an opera singer, as well as a Tony-nominated actor, Amber Gray, who is currently starring in Hadestown on Broadway. (Gray, Savitri D. notes, is one of several participants who’ve met their mates in the choir.)

“Some people end up in the choir because they are deeply invested in direct action activism,” says Sunder Ganglani, who has written several of the choir’s most recent songs. Others simply do it for the love of singing. “There are many roads for entry,” Ganglani confirms.

For Talen, activism clearly is a serious tenet of faith. As a way of minimizing his carbon footprint, he flew standby to the U.K., and donated a portion of the British Arts Council funds to a bicycle delivery group and a community garden. By all accounts, locals seemed open to listening to New York City’s faux clergyman. Talen appeared on the BBC, and preached outside the British Museum dressed in a pink suit and carrying a matching pink megaphone. 

His bullhorns were seized regularly by the New York Police Department when he first started railing against consumerism in Times Square during the late 1990’s. It’s not lost on Reverend Billy that his current mode of conveying apocalyptic environmental concern has something in common with the sidewalk preachers he lampooned all those years ago.

“I do feel that I’m getting back to some of the fire and brimstone when I shout about the fires and the floods,” he says, chuckling. “It sounds a lot like those screaming Old Testament people that I was satirizing 20 years ago. And here we are with all that fire and brimstone actually happening in our lives.”

Don’t need a house if you’ve got one of these

.

Abuelo Norte

has thousands of military surplus “House Coats”

for sale, $39.95.

Box 8000

Haley, Idaho

Krishnamurti by Beaton ~ Thank you Edgar Boyles

Jiddu Krishnamurti (/ˈdʒɪduːkrɪʃnəˈmuːrti/; 11 May 1895 – 17 February 1986) was a philosopher, speaker and writer. In his early life, he was groomed to be the new World Teacher, but later rejected this mantle and withdrew from the Theosophy organization behind it. His interests included psychological revolution, the nature of mindmeditation, inquiry, human relationships, and bringing about radical change in society. He stressed the need for a revolution in the psyche of every human being and emphasised that such revolution cannot be brought about by any external entity, be it religious, political, or social.

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There’s shouting from the amen corner